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the authentic Italian struffoli recipe, a traditional Christmas treat





the Italian struffoli recipe: tiny dough balls, fried and dipped in honey, lastly, sprinkled with colorful confetti

 

the italian struffoli recipe: tiny dough balls, fried and dipped in honey, lastly sprinkled with colorful confetti

the italian struffoli recipe: tiny dough balls, fried and dipped in honey, lastly sprinkled with colorful confetti

 

the struffoli recipe

An Italian Christmas table, at the end of the night (or lunch), is full of Pandoro, Panettone, Limoncello, Amari and other sweet treats… So there’s no need to prepare a dessert too.

But everyone will certainly have one tiny sticky honey ball, maybe two, maybe four, maybe a few more while playing cards lately in the day…

We are talking of small and fried dough balls, dipped in honey, and finally sprinkled with colorful confetti. A traditional Neapolitan dessert, present in every table of the peninsula.

I made mine with gold sprinkles, cause it’s a recipe from the  vintage gold issue.

this girl loves…

Hello, hello.

I am giggling hard today…

Signs are clear.

It was pettole day (S. Cecilia) on Tuesday (other fried dough balls sprinkled with sugar or salt).

And S. Cecilia, in Taranto (Puglia, Luca’s city of birth) means you can officially begin Christmas celebrations.

But there’s more.

Last weekend was the Feria de la Chinita, a Venezuelan religious (and not: think of music, dancing, rum and foooood) festivity that, again, sanctions…

…IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME!

And this girl loves Christmas.

 

Subscribe and get all the Cookies & treats recipes from the Christmas bakery Project of the Fall Issue

the vintage gold project

To celebrate, the new project is (guess) Christmassy.

I’ll share 4 recipes from the Winter Issue of the Gourmet Mag,

3 traditional and authentic Italian recipes for Christmas and 1 diy French-y foodie gift idea, so simple you might wait until the 24th to make it.

 

the italian struffoli recipe: tiny dough balls, fried and dipped in honey, lastly sprinkled with colorful confetti
the italian struffoli recipe: tiny dough balls, fried and dipped in honey, lastly sprinkled with colorful confetti

 

So…

it’s time to fry!

5.0 from 3 reviews
the (neapolitan) italian struffoli recipe
 
author:
recipe type: authentic Italian recipes
cuisine: italian
serves: 2-4 people, feel free to duplicate quantities as needed
ingredients
how to
  1. Place flour on a working surface (or food processor bowl). Form a hole in the middle and pour in egg, butter, sugar, lemon zest, limoncello and 1 pinch of salt.
  2. Work the dough until it comes together and you can form a ball.
  3. Cover the dough and let it rest in a warm spot of the house for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Take back the dough and work it to get 3 cm/1 inch large cylinders. Cut them in 2.5 cm/1 inch pieces and display them over a floured surface. For a better result, you may work each piece between your palms to get a spherical, more regular form (not mandatory).
  5. Heat the oil in a medium tall pot.
  6. Shake the struffoli to get rid of excess flour, using a coriander or fine thieve, and dip them in the hot oil. When they get golden brown, use a skimmer to transfer them to a plate with blotting paper.
  7. Immediately after frying, melt honey in a large pot. Throw in the struffoli and mix delicately. As soon as they are well covered with honey, and the temperature has decreased a bit, add confetti, mix well and pour the whole thing on a serving plate.
  8. Bring to room temperature and serve (you can make them 1-2 days ahead of time).

 

This is a hand eating dessert. People can pick one tiny sweet ball at the time from the pyramid (or other figure formed). Or they can complicatedly use tongs…

 

enjoy a sweet Italian Christmas!

Claudia

 

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6 Comments

  1. I imagine if these are as good as the look and sound, that it’s lucky they come in small bites. I want to try making these soon, maybe even sooner then soon : )

  2. Very interesting recipe, I might try this out. Love it

  3. I have never tried these with limoncello, great idea!

  4. Goodness gracious me these sound utterly heavenly! I need to make a batch of these soon!

  5. Oh wow, I could probably eat a hundred of these delectable morsels! I love struffoli!

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