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how to cook fresh borlotti beans

How to cook fresh borlotti beans like an Italian.

Learn how Italians cook delicious fresh borlotti beans just with garlic and bay leaves.

cooked borlotti beans in mason jar
shelled borlotti beans in a pot with water

When you find borlotti beans that are fresh, still in the pod, catch them before they’re gone: cooking fresh borlotti beans is a life experience. First of all, because of the time you spend shelling them: for some, it is a waste of time, for me, it is kitchen meditation. Second, because it’s an opportunity to learn how to cook fresh borlotti beans like an Italian.
A very easy recipe, by the way.

borlotti beans at the greengrocer

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how to cook fresh borlotti beans

Course Side Dish
Cuisine Italian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 2
Author Claudia Rinaldi

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups fresh borlotti beans
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 bay leaves
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Shell the beans and place them in a pot with the garlic clove (no need to peel it) and the bay leaves.

  2. Cover entirely with water and turn on the heat to medium.
  3. Cook, lid on, but leaving a little opening, about 40 minutes, or until fork-tender.

  4. Every now and then, check and add water if necessary.
  5. When thoroughly cooked, salt beans to your taste.
fresh borlotti beans, garlic and bay leaves
single borlotti bean out of the pod

add pasta and comfort your soul

Pasta e fagioli recipe by Gourmet Project

the authentic Pasta e Fagioli recipe

Enjoy your borlotti beans.

Claudia

Claudia Rinaldi

Claudia Rinaldi

Author

Digital artisan and curator of the Simposio book series; maker of Gourmet Project, an Italian food and culture blog; and life in Italy relator through the Italian Colors Newsletter. Claudia lives in magnificent Rome. She loves pasta, “melanzane alla parmigiana”, hats, suitcases and airports, Christmas, and books. Her mission is to show you that Italy is so much more than spaghetti and clichés, but a land of endless traditions, flavors, and heritage.