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Italian canning recipes: how to preserve eggplants in olive oil





how to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes

 

How to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes. Get this and more Italian eggplant recipes on GP, an Italian food blog.
How to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes. Get this and more Italian eggplant recipes on GP, an Italian food blog.

 

home canning

This year I’m into canning recipes.

I’ve been canning lots of eggplants: an anticipatory move, thinking of Fall and Winter cheese boards and charcuterie plates.

The kitchen is full of canning jars, lids, and labels, and there was no problem in finding canning recipes: Italian cuisine is full of food preservation recipes. Tradition is “casalinghe” (=housewives), dedicate a big part of their Fall kitchen activity to preserving. Canned tomatoes and passata are the must-have canning recipes, but then come vegetables, jams, pesto…

Here’s an eggplant Italian canning recipe 😉

 

Melanzane funghetto: a super easy Italian eggplant recipe. Get this and more Italian vegetarian eggplant recipes on Gourmet Project, a Rome based Italian food blog.
How to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes. Get this and more Italian eggplant recipes on GP, an Italian food blog.

 

 

Forest bathing

You know when you find out about something that sounds profoundly familiar? Maybe you had heard about it before. Or maybe it is somehow part of your inner being (a previous life?).

If you ask me, I have a feeling I was Japanese in a previous life.

Things that might confirm my thesis:

  • I have kind of oriental shaped eyes
  • I love Japan and feel so good when I’m there, as in no other place on Earth
  • I’m seriously addicted to ramen, noodles and wasabi

Things that may dismantle my thesis:

  • I’m so tall…

Why was I dwelling about Japan?

Oh yes, my previous life, when I heard of shinrin-yoku (森林浴) for the first time.

 

Forest bathing in Rome: an Italian Fall bucket list
Forest bathing in Rome: an Italian Fall bucket list

 

The second time was the other day while listening to my new podcast findMejor con Gaby Vargas”. A graceful and sophisticated lady that gives you 5 minutes talks about various topics related to health, corporeal and incorporeal.

Can you believe I’m listening to a Mexican (almost sure they’re Mexican) radio podcast, talking about Japanese practices, while taking my dog for a walk here in Rome?

Isn’t the www great?

Do I sound like an old lady from another era?

Kind of feel like one 🙂

Ok, let’s get to the point. Shinrin-yoku means forest bathing: the practice of walking in a forest, unplugged from the city and totally plugged to Nature. A detox both for your body and your soul.

I’ve been practicing shinrin-yoku for the past two weeks, 4 mornings a week, in good company:

 

Forest bathing in Rome: an Italian Fall bucket list
Forest bathing in Rome: an Italian Fall bucket list

 

I must say I’m quite lucky. Villa Ada, the closest Roman Villa (park) near my house, is also the largest urban forest in Europe. So I’m not going for the placebo, I have the real thing, right here.

These are the things that make me happy :-).

I think it works.

It took me the first two days to reach some sort of mindfulness state, and a few more to make it last more than a few minutes. But then, I suddenly felt something unusual coming from my inner self. Happiness? Well-being? Fun?

I know what you’re thinking: isn’t it just a walk in the park? Apparently no: this time I was paying attention. Looking at the leaves, assimilating the shades of colors, listening to sounds, perceiving smells… I was conscious of what I was doing. Conscious of the benefits. Conscious of the necessity to be there, present, in that precise moment.

Please try it.

{And, if you are looking for more Fall activities and inspiration, check my Italian Fall Bucket List!}

 

kitchen bathing

I wonder if there’s a Kitchen bath practice as well. That’s another place where I feel very well. Cooking is an activity that releases my tensions, gives me unnatural energy and raises my levels of serotonin. Although sometimes it’s overwhelming, home canning recipes are the climax of all said.

So let’s boil those cans and screw those lids 🙂

 

How to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes. Get this and more Italian eggplant recipes on GP, an Italian food blog.
How to preserve eggplants in olive oil according to Italian canning recipes. Get this and more Italian eggplant recipes on GP, an Italian food blog.

 

 

preserved eggplants in oil: a home canning recipe

Italian canning recipes: how to preserve eggplants in olive oil
 
author:
recipe type: canning recipes
cuisine: italian
serves: one medium jar
ingredients
  • 3 long eggplants
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 red chili
  • ½ red onion
  • 100 gr (3.5 oz) of white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon of black pepper corns
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse salt
how to
  1. Peel the eggplants (completely or partially if you like them a little sour) and slice them (medium size slices).
  2. Place them in a tray or bowl and sprinkle them with salt (if you need to display them on different layers, salt each layer).
  3. Set them aside for at least an hour.
  4. Rinse them, drain them and wrap them in a kitchen cloth (in 15 minutes it should absorb most of the remaining water).
  5. Fill a medium pot of water, add the vinegar, the bay leaves, and the peppercorns, and bring them to a boil.
  6. Meanwhile thinly slice the onion.
  7. When water is boiling, add the sliced onion and eggplants. Cook 2 minutes.
  8. Drain the eggplants well and display them on a new kitchen cloth. Bring them to room temperature.
  9. Meanwhile thinly slice or chop the garlic clove and the chili. And remove the leaves from the thyme sprig.
  10. Take a sterilized, medium size jar. Pour in a couple tablespoons of olive oil. Display a layer of eggplant slices, sprinkle them with a few slices of garlic, a pinch of chili and one of thyme leaves. Repeat with a second layer and go on until you’ve filled the jar (leave an inch from the border free).
  11. Close the jar with a clean, sterilized lid.

 

Water bath the jar 60 minutes. Bring to room temperature and check for the vacuum. If not repeat all over again.

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